International Jobs Services Albert Lea MN

Local resource for international job services in Albert Lea. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to overseas careers, as well as advice and content on finding an international career.

Specialty Personnel Services
(877) 756-9004
322 S Broadway Ave
Albert Lea, MN

Data Provided By:
Specialty Personnel Services
(877) 756-9004
322 S Broadway Ave
Albert Lea, MN

Data Provided By:
Albert Lea - Minnesota WorkForce Center
(507) 379-3409
1649 West Main Street
Albert Lea, MN
 
Accountants For All Seasons
(612) 338-4884
1221 Nicollet Ave
Minneapolis, MN

Data Provided By:
Brigham Group
(952) 432-6060
15010 Glazier Ave
Apple Valley, MN

Data Provided By:
Pinpoint Consulting
(507) 377-3575
211 6th Avenue South
Albert Lea, MN

Data Provided By:
Pinpoint Consulting
(507) 377-3575
211 6th Avenue South
Albert Lea, MN

Data Provided By:
Austin - Minnesota WorkForce Center
(507) 433-0555
1600 8th Avenue, NW, Riverland Community College
Austin, MN
 
Consultis
(651) 291-5430
30 7th St. E
St Paul, MN

Data Provided By:
Abc Employment Service
(651) 287-8145
1010 University Ave W
St Paul, MN

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Can Working Overseas Help You Get a Job Back Home?

Downtown Hong Kong 

There’s no doubt about it – even with solid job growth in dozens of career fields for the 2008-2018 projections decade, the competition for high-paying positions is still intense. Employers are always on the look out for the cream of the crop, so today’s young job seeker must accumulate admirable list of accomplishments in order to have a leg up on everyone else.

Besides having an impressive list of accomplishments at the academic level, employers such as Ernst & Young are also interested in applicants who have worked overseas in an internship or other job, or served with an organization such as the Peace Corps. Ernst & Young’s director of campus recruiting for the Americas, Dan Black, says that as far as he is concerned, young applicants with this background have a leg up on everyone else.

“We definitely see overseas experience as an advantage,” he says. He directs campus hiring for the London-based accounting and consulting giant, which has 140,000 employees worldwide. “Our clients are demanding more of us these days,” he explains. “They want diversity of thought and diversity of values, and many of our clients are multinationals.”

Employers feel the advantages do not stop here.

Dawn Chandler, a management professor at California Polytechnic State University, notes that spending time abroad can teach workers to deal with very different leadership styles. In Scandinavian countries, for instance, leadership is more egalitarian and participatory and less authoritarian. In Asia, on the other hand, the gulf in power between junior employees and leaders is much deeper. The U.S. falls somewhere in between.

Another advantage, notes Chandler: Time overseas familiarizes you with international legislation and standards. “If your firm wants to open a plant in China, it helps if you know how to get through the bureaucracy there,” she says.

Finding yourself a member of a minority group in a foreign country can be character building, both professionally and personally, notes Gary Baker, the U.S. global mobility leader for the consulting and accounting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers, which has offices in 154 countries. “It gives you a greater respect for other cultures, and you learn to be better at managing teams that are diverse.”

According to Mary Ann Walsh, a New York career and executive coach specializing in global talent management, climbing the ladder overseas is much faster than climbing the career ladder in the U.S.

Walsh has a number of American clients who moved overseas shortly after college and graduate school. They advanced much more quickly than if they had tried to climb the career ladder in the U.S. One young woman who works in financial services is already doing deals with senior Chinese executives even though she doesn’t speak Mandarin.

Another client of Walsh’s headed to London for a financial services job straight from college. Then ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Professional Journey

Working Abroad, Best Overseas Jobs for Americans

Working Overseas_China Map

To work abroad, it takes certain training and skills as well as an independent and adventurous spirit. Working abroad offers an opportunity to break away from dreary unemployment statistics or a lackluster career, while exploring new and exciting environs. A New York Times article published back in 2009 even suggested that China was the new American dream for young people looking for challenging career opportunities. So, if you’re looking for the best overseas jobs for Americans, browse through the top ten list below to see where your education and skills fit in.

10. U.S. Government Jobs: According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the U.S. currently has some 88,700 overseas jobs. The positions that are most often available include administrative, technical and professional, accountants, auditors, foreign service officers, budget and program officers, management analysts, nurses, procurement officers, shorthand reporters, equipment specialists, engineers, social workers, housing officers, teachers, and alcohol and drug abuse specialists.

The average salary range for government jobs can range from $25,000 up to $100,000+ depending on your skills, education level, experiences and job choice. For more information about working abroad for the U.S. government, visit Federaljobs.net .

9. Private Sector Jobs: Job boards like Monster.com International provide descriptions and opportunities that match up with specific multi-national companies. The job description usually includes all of the necessary information including pay, educational requirements and benefits.

Very much like the government availability, the range of salaries mirror the skill level you pursue. Ordinarily, when a major corporation is seeking to fill a position from outside the locale, they are looking for a higher skill level. But if you have those skills, put them into play. To help you get started, visit: Overseasdigest.com or Workingoverseas.com .

Teaching English

8. English as a Second language (ESL): International business demands have steadily relied on overseas negotiations in English, so one of the mainstays for the overseas employment market is teaching English as a second language. English instructors are needed in Korea, Brazil, Norway, Thailand, and a multitude of other countries.

Although the compensation level can be low, many of the English teaching programs provide accommodations and stipends in excess of a basic amount of remuneration. So you will have the opportunity to save your entire salary during the term you choose. There are certain certifications that may also help market your teaching ability. For ESL job postings, visit Esljobs.com .

7. Computer Programming: With the advent of connectivity to the Internet, more developing countries seek those with computer skills to help develop websites, specialized programming skills, and basic understanding of computer technology. Language skills can often be a barrier, but not always. Not only can you esta...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Professional Journey